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  • 11/21/2013

    Lightning is dangerous.  That’s pretty obvious and the NCAA Rules (Appendix C) cover a general protocol and approach and the 2013 Sports Medicine Handbook Guideline 1E has a more detailed perspective.  Ultimately, these rules and protocol are put in place to ensure the safety of the participants and spectators.  While they outline a general set of guidelines and recommendations, nothing replaces the common sense and eyes/ears of the referee crew.  It is the crew’s responsibility to ensure the conditions are safe to the best of their ability utilizing all the information that they have available.  The referee should rely on all available information that might include a lightning detection system, direct links to a local meteorological professional, real time radar scans and of course, what he can hear and see.  For NCAA postseason games, this is the responsibility of the NCAA games committee.

    Deciding not to start a game due to lightening may be a controversial decision for some of those involved; however, the safety of the participants is the paramount consideration.  Teams may have traveled a long distance to play an important game and the compactness of the collegiate season may limit options for rescheduling games.  These economic and competitive considerations cannot take precedence over the players’ safety.  There have been some situations where referees have been asked to allow games to be played when the conditions were questionable due to the “importance” of the match or the “difficulty rescheduling.”  It is the referee’s responsibility to act in the interest of safety first!  If there are conflicting pieces of information such as an on-site detection system indicating lightning in the area and a weather professional or radar indicating the system has moved far enough away to be safe, err on the side of safety until the information can be aligned.

    The NCAA rules also cover the amount of time allowed for lightning delays.  Rule 10.11 states, “With reference to game interruptions and the length of waiting time beyond which the game cannot be started and/or restarted: No contest may be started or resumed that has not been restarted before an additional 90 minutes after the conclusion of a regulation 90-minute game, unless mutually agreed upon before the game or by conference policy.   Once a game begins and later is suspended for weather, the contest should be restarted in 90 minutes or should be restarted within the amount of time the games committee predetermined before the start of the game.  If it has reached beyond the 70th minute, it is a complete contest unless it is a Division I postseason contest, which must play the full 90 minutes.  If the game cannot be completed the same day, it must be replayed in its entirety.

  • 11/19/2013

    The NCAA deals very strictly with fighting and fighting ejections.  

    What is a fight?

    •  A fight is defined as a deliberate strike or punch or an attempt to strike or punch another player, official, coach or bench personnel.  These acts include, but are not limited to, kicking, head-butting, hair pulling or an open-handed strike if done deliberately and in a malicious manner.
    •  A player, coach or bench personnel shall be ejected if he or she is guilty of fighting or leaves the coaching area to participate in an altercation. (Note:   A coach or team representative [but not a player or substitute] may leave the coaching area during an altercation, providing it is an attempt to restore order.)
     

    How do you report it during the game?

    •  The referee shall inform the player(s), the head coach(s) and the official scorekeeper, who shall record on the official NCAA box score form, that an ejection for fighting has been issued.


    How do you report it after the game?

    •  The referee shall electronically complete and file the fight reporting form located on the NCAA Soccer Central Hub website at https://NCAAsoccer.arbitersports.com within 24 hours of completion of the game.  Notification of the fighting ejection(s) and two-game suspension shall be sent by the NCAA national office to the offending individual’s institution and the governing sports authority.
    •  The “points of emphasis” in the NCAA rules book states: “All references in the rules book to reports required to be filed by the referee refer to reports that must be dispatched electronically within 24 hours after the completion of the game to which the report relates.  (Exception: Referees shall file fighting report immediately after the game.)  

     

  • 11/12/2013

    Please click here to read NCAA Postseason Soccer Officiating Policies and Procedures.

    Administrative Meeting. The administrative meeting shall be held not later than two hours prior to the start of the first match at each site. If individuals that are required to be in attendance at the meeting (participating institutions representatives, officiating crew or center referee, site representative and tournament personnel) have arrived at the site the evening before competition, then the meeting may be conducted that evening. The host institution is responsible for communicating this information to all attendees in a timely manner so appropriate arrangements may be made.

    One member of the officiating crew (preferably the center referee, if available) should attend the administrative meeting in person or via conference call. If a site is hosting multiple games during a round, then an official from each officiating crew at that site must call-in to the meeting.

    Game Day Arrival/Officials Meeting.

    • All officials must be on-site no later than two hours prior to the start of their assigned match allowing time for the officiating crew (or local member of the assigned crew) to survey the field for any concerns and determine the goal for potential penalty kicks. The officials meeting should take place no later than 90 minutes prior to the match and include the officiating crew, site representative and tournament director.

    RefPay. Officials for all divisions of the NCAA soccer championships will receive payment via RefPay. If you have not set up your RefPay account yet, please do so immediately to ensure timely payment. Instructions were provided when you signed up for your Arbiter account. If you need assistance with setting up your account, please call the RefPay customer support line at 801/576-1251.

    After you complete an officiating assignment, please log back into RefPay to verify that the mileage, per diem and game fee are correct. If an item has been reported incorrectly, then please contact your regional assignor within 48 hours of the conclusion of your assignment.

    Fees.

    Preliminary Rounds

    Championship

    Ref AR Alt*

    Flat Fee

    (All)

    # of Officials

    Division I
    Men &
    Women

    $240

    $160

    $100

    $800

    7

    Division II
    Men &
    Women

    $180

    $135

    $80

    $400

    7 (Men’s);

    7 (Women’s)

    Division III
    Men &
    Women

    $173

    $124

    $78

    $298

    7 (Men’s),

    7 (Women’s)


    Expense Reimbursement. Officials, including the alternate official, assigned to preliminary-round matches shall receive ground transportation expenses based on 50 cents per mile. Officials for preliminary rounds must be within driving distance of the host site (Division I - 400 miles one way; Divisions II and III – 500 miles one way) or approved for a flight. (Note: Division I does have an exception for the referee only for quarterfinal matches, if warranted.)

    Officials for the Men’s College Cup, Women’s College Cup and Divisions II and III Men’s and Women’s Soccer Championship matches only may be reimbursed for air travel, not to exceed jet coach air fare. If an official must fly, travel arrangements must be made through the NCAA travel service at Short’s Travel Management, 866/655-9215.

    Hotel expenses (excluding incidentals) for officials required to stay overnight at the championship site (including preliminary rounds) shall be paid by the host institution and later reimbursed by the NCAA. The host institution will make the hotel reservation. Officials, including the alternate official, will receive $45 per diem for meals and incidentals on each day of the championship, beginning with the day of arrival and ending with the day of departure. Officials must present a credit card upon hotel check-in for incidentals. The host or the NCAA will not responsible for charges incurred other than room and taxes.

    Officials not required to remain overnight at the site also shall receive $45 per diem.

     

  • 10/23/2013

    A TACTICAL FOUL IS A FOUL THAT BREAKS UP A PROMISING ATTACK OR DENIES A GOAL SCORING OPPORTUNITY.

    When deciding whether or not to caution for a tactical foul take the following into consideration:

    -Chance to score a goal
    -Distance between the incident and the goal
    -Number of defenders involved in the play
    -Location of defenders
    -Number of attackers involved in the play
    -Location of attackers
    -Direction of the play
    -Does the attacker have control of the ball?
    -Can the attacker gain control of the ball?
    -Options to pass the ball
    -Skill of the player

    Click here to view this information as a PowerPoint presentation.  If you are unable to view the videos within the PowerPoint presentation, please click here to view them on the VIDEO tab.

    Ryan Cigich
    National Coordinator Men’s & Women’s Soccer Officials


     

  • 10/15/2013

    Bench Personnel:

    There is a happy medium of bench behavior to strive for.  On one extreme, some officials are allowing visual, audible, and persistent complaining by coaches that is abusive to go without any sanction or action.  On the other extreme, some officials are being dismissive of fair and reasonable questions or requests to monitor infractions such as fouls and encroachment.  A few guidelines on bench behavior:

    - Allow the coaching staff to have some interaction with you on a polite and professional basis.  This is part of your overall game management.  Expect some emotion on critical decisions.  These comments are usually brief, even if they are sometimes loud.  If the emotional outburst persists, firmly but politely let the coach know you are willing to listen when they are ready to speak with (not scream at) you more calmly.  Responding in a confrontational manner will do little to calm them down.  At times listening is the best option.  Cutting them off builds confrontation rather than compliance for future requests.

    -Allowing for dialogue and the occasional emotional outburst does not equate allowing unfettered screaming, yelling, or abuse, particularly when profanity is used.  Profanity in the collegiate game should never be permitted.  If the abuse is directed at the Referee or an AR, or if the coaching staff leaves the coaching and team area to pursue an official, it cannot be ignored.  Establish a clear understanding during the pregame when bench personnel approach irresponsible behavior.  If a 4th official or AR calls a referee over to card a coach/asst. coach for dissent, there is very little reason for a referee not to honor that request.

    Clock Management

    The ability to stop the clock in cases of time wasting is a very useful tool and part of your overall game management.  Throwing or kicking the ball away to prevent or delay a restart is not acceptable and must be dealt with.  There are several options between the extremes of ignoring it and issuing a caution. 

    There must be an awareness of when such delay tactics are likely – preventing a quick kick that catches the defense unprepared (especially as play gets closer to goal), holding a lead or tie, and to break momentum of the opponent are prime examples.  Players who delay a restart run the risk of receiving a caution for that action. At minimum, the player shall be verbally warned.  If a player repeats the offense after a verbal warning, there is little reason not to caution that player.

    Injury management

    If possible assess the situation before having a trainer brought on.  Serious injuries such as a head/neck injury, broken leg, any signs of a concussion, etc. should require the immediate attention of the medical staff.  Minor injuries (e.g. cramp) should be assessed by the Referee prior to calling for the trainer.  Bench-side AR or 4th Official can assist by going to a position near the trainer so they are ready to come in but do not enter until they are beckoned by the referee.  Referees should always respond on the side of caution for the health and safety of the student athlete.

    Social Media

    Every game should be treated with respect.  No matter what level it is important to the participants and it should be shown by your behavior that you take it seriously as well. All officials should be aware that any comment they make at any time could be overheard and will be misconstrued if it is possible to do so. You should not be saying anything regarding a game that you would not be willing to have published on the front page of the newspaper. This includes, and is particularly relevant to any social media. Do not post comments about games or critiques of officials, players or coaches on webpages, Facebook, twitter, or any other electronic media. It will come back to haunt you!

    Ryan Cigich
    National Coordinator Men’s & Women’s Soccer Officials

     

  • 10/9/2013

    When deciding Advantage the Referee should consider the following:

    Distance from the goal

    -chance to score a goal
    -chance of a promising attack

    Players

    -number of defenders
    -number of attackers

    Severity of the foul  - Does the foul warrant a caution or ejection?

    Atmosphere/Temperature of the match - Does your match control need the foul?

    Time of the match

    Possession of the ball

    Skill of the player

    Score of the match

    Location of the foul should always be considered before giving advantage:

    Defensive zone – Typically play it safe and give a free kick, unless you have exceptional circumstances to let play continue.

    Midfield – Look for an immediate attacking opportunity (number of defenders and attackers) as well as distance to goal.  The skill of the player and his/her ability to regain possession of the ball should be taken into consideration.  Also consider the severity of the foul and the overall control of the match.

    Attacking zone – Take into account all considerations but consider giving a free kick if its more of a benefit to the attacking team.

    Click here to view this information as a PowerPoint presentation.  If you are unable to view the Advantage videos within the PowerPoint presentation, please click here to view them on the VIDEO tab.

    Ryan Cigich
    National Coordinator Men’s & Women’s Soccer Officials


     

  • 9/30/2013


    PLAYERS AND SUBSTITUTES:

    Allowable Substitution Times:
       
    -Goal Kick
    -Team’s own throw-in (if the team in possession chooses to substitute the opposing team may also substitute)  
    -Team’s own corner kick (if the team in possession chooses to substitute the opposing team may also substitute)
    -After a goal
    -Between periods
    -When a player has been cautioned (sub may occur for the player(s) cautioned; if such sub is made the opponent may sub an equal number of players)


    PLAYERS AND SUBSTITUTES:

    Re-Entry:

    When a substitute replaces a field player during the first half:

    --The player leaving the game may not re-enter during the first half.
     
    When a substitute replaces a field player during the second half:

    --Any player who has left the game may re-enter one time during the second half.
     
    When a substitute replaces a field player during either overtime period:

    --The player leaving the game may not re-enter during that particular overtime period (just like the first half of the game).  Each overtime period is treated as a separate period.  A player who is substituted for in the first overtime period MAY play in the second overtime period.


    Goalkeepers:

    -The goalkeeper who started the game may re-enter once each period provided the only position they play is goalkeeper.

    -If the starting goalkeeper remains in the game as a field player, they are not allowed to re-enter as goalkeeper except during the second half.

    -If a substitute replaces the starting goalkeeper who goes to the bench, the starting goalkeeper may return to the game as goalkeeper.  This may happen once each period.

    -A substitute goalkeeper may re-enter only during the second period.

    -If a goalkeeper is ejected, the coach may substitute for the ejected goalkeeper only.  If a substitution is made, a field player shall be removed.  The opponents may not substitute at this time.


    INJURIES:

    Injury caused by an opponent who was cautioned or ejected:

    -Injured player may be substituted for and can re-enter in the same period at any stoppage of play or at any of the allowable times for normal substitutions.
    -Neither the injured player nor the substitute is charged with a substitution.

    Bleeding Injury and Signs of Concussion:

    -Injured player may be substituted for and can re-enter in the same period at any stoppage of play or at any of the allowable times for normal substitutions provided the appropriate medical personnel have given clearance.
    -Neither the injured player nor the substitute is charged with a substitution.
    -A player with signs of a concussion must be cleared by team physician or designee according to the concussion management plan

    Normal Injury/Illness:

    -Field players substituted for a normal injury shall not re-enter the game in the 1st half (one re-entry in the second half)
    -An injured player who leaves the field and the team plays short may re-enter the game during the run of play or at any stoppage of play from the halfway line on the bench side of the field.
     

  • 8/23/2013


    For every red card issued, a Red Card Form (see FORMS) must be submitted. Click here for new and important information regarding notifications and depository.

  • 8/22/2013


    POSITIONING

    The Referee should take the following into consideration in order to be in the best position for the game situation:

    1. Play Between Referee and AR
    2. Reading of the game; next phase of play
    3. Proximity From Play
    4. Angle of View
    5. View Blocked By Players

    General Positioning Recommendations:

    1. The best position is the position that allows the Referee to make the correct decision.
    2. The play should generally be between the Referee and the lead AR.  Thus having the lead AR within the Referee’s peripheral vision.
    3. Referees should always be thinking and be ready for the “next phase of play."
    4. The Referee should be close enough to the play without interfering with play.  At times the Referee may need to trade proximity from play for a better angle of view.
    5. The best position may not always be in the vicinity of the ball.  Other factors that the referee must pay attention to include:
           a)  Off the ball confrontations
           b)  Offenses in the area of the "next phase of play"
           c)  Offenses occurring after teh ball is played away
    6. Proximity brings credibility.

    Recommendations about positioning are based on generalities and must be adjusted based on specific information about the teams, players, and situations in the match up to that point.

    Please click the link below to access the Positioning videos, which may also be viewed by clicking on the VIDEO tab:

    NCAA Soccer Referee Positioning Videos

    Ryan Cigich
    National Coordinator Men’s & Women’s Soccer Officials

     

  • 8/9/2013


    Points of Emphasis

    Welcome to the 2013 season!  This is the first of a series of articles and video training that will be posted on the NCAA Soccer Officiating Center Circle. There are no rules changes for the 2013 season, as this is the second year of the two-year rules cycle.

    Points of Emphasis Listed in Rule Book

    In each edition of the NCAA Men’s and Women’s Soccer Rules, there are several areas that are given special attention. These are identified as points of emphasis. While they may not represent any rules changes as such, their importance must not be overlooked. Points of emphasis are accentuated with a frame around the specific rule within the main text of the rules book.  Please review the Points of Emphasis located on Page 5 of the rules book.

    Red Card and Fighting Reporting

    Of particular concern has been the red card reporting protocol and follow through.  Red cards MUST be reported to the NCAA. The form and link are housed on the NCAA Soccer Officiating Center Circle. This MUST be done within 24 hours of the completion of the match.  It is critical that referees follow all of the red card protocols outlined in Rules 5 and 12. As there are different penalties for being ejected for a fight, particular reporting requirements both on the field and after the match are in place for fighting ejections. To quote the rules book, a fight is defined:

    Rule 12.6.1 Fighting. Definition: A fight is defined as a deliberate strike or punch or an attempt to strike or punch another player, official, coach or bench personnel.  These acts include, but are not limited to, kicking, head-butting, hair pulling or an open-handed strike if done deliberately and in a malicious manner.

    Rule 12.6.1.3. The referee shall inform the player(s), the head coach(s) and the official scorekeeper, who shall record on the official NCAA box score form, that an ejection for fighting has been issued.  In addition, the referee shall electronically complete and file the fight reporting form located on the NCAA Soccer Central Hub website at www.NCAAsoccer.arbitersports.com within 24 hours of completion of the game.  Notification of the fighting ejection(s) and two-game suspension shall be sent by the NCAA national office to the offending individual’s institution and the governing sports authority. (See Rule 12.12.1.)

    If the player is ejected per Rule 12.3.3 “fighting,” the referee MUST tell the player, the head coach and the scorekeeper at the time of the ejections that the red card was issued for FIGHTING. This MUST be indicated in the score book and the referee MUST verify that entry upon the completion of the game when signing the scorebook. The referee MUST file the reports as indicated above within 24 hours.

    Situations from Last Season Requiring Greater Attention This Year

    Overtime – Rule 7.1.1

    For ALL regular season games, two sudden victory overtime periods of 10 minutes each will be played. A coin toss called by the visiting team will determine choice of ends of the field or the kickoff before the start of the first sudden-victory overtime period. Teams shall change ends of the field to start the second sudden-victory overtime period. If the score is still tied at the end of the second sudden victory overtime period, the game will remain a tie.

    There is NO option for the overtime periods to be set aside by mutual consent of the coaches, overtimes MUST be played.  There were situations in 2012 where the overtime period continued after a team scored a goal. This is incorrect. The game is over when the first goal is scored in the overtime period.

    Postgame duties – Rule 5.5.2

    All officials should review and sign the official NCAA box score. Be sure to check the accuracy of the score, cards, and any other disciplinary actions. For all ejections, the referee shall electronically complete and file the appropriate form(s) on the NCAA Soccer Central Hub within 24 hours of completion of the game. This is a REQUIREMENT. Referees must ensure the recorded information is accurate and must complete the online red card form for any issued during the contest.

    Best of luck and have a great 2013 season!

    Ryan Cigich
    National Coordinator Men’s & Women’s Soccer Officials

  • 8/7/2013

    We are excited about the new season and look forward to the opportunities to communicate important soccer information with you this year on the NCAA Soccer Central Hub.  Please visit the Center Circle Central Hub frequently to stay current on the latest soccer officiating news and information.  On the central hub, you will be able to read the latest rules interpretations from Ken Andres the Secretary-Rules Editor and bulletins from the National Coordinator, and review videos clips on correct application of the rules and mechanics.

    All the best this season!

    Ryan Cigich
    National Coordinator Men’s & Women’s Soccer Officials

  • 5/17/2013

    An NCAA sports committee may not require membership in any specific officials’ association as a prerequisite for selection to officiate in an NCAA tournament.  For all NCAA postseason soccer matches, officials (referee, assistant, alternate) shall be selected and assigned by the NCAA national coordinator of officials with assistance from the regional advisors on approval of the respective NCAA Soccer Committee.  

    In addition, officials shall adhere to the Association’s policies relating to gambling activities and drug and alcohol use.  In addition, officials must conduct themselves in a manner befitting intercollegiate athletics (e.g., character, fitness, rules knowledge, and officiating performance) are all of the highest order. Failure to do so may result in termination of the officiating assignment.

    --Officials MUST take and pass an online NCAA SOCCER RULES TEST.  Officials will have two attempts to pass the exam with a 90 percent or better. The test requirement must be fulfilled not later than Monday, August 19, 2013.

    --Officials MUST be REGISTERED with ncaasoccer.arbitersports.com in order to be considered and potentially receive an NCAA postseason assignment.

    --Officials shall be qualified, competent and appropriately credentialed.  In selecting officials, experience and ability as a referee and as an assistant referee shall be considered separately.

    --Other requirements including a minimum number of matches may be required based on the respective NCAA soccer championship.

    This site is dedicated to the goal of promoting nationwide consistency for collegiate soccer officials.  In addition to the standard resources, the site will have quizzes, video clips, and articles added throughout the season.

    As always, your suggestions, thoughts, and ideas on ways to improve the site are welcome.

    Thanks for your commitment to NCAA Soccer.
     

 
 
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